Brazilian Catholic Apostolic Church -UK (ICAB-UK)

          Founded by decree as a Sui Iuris Catholic Church by His Holiness, Patriarch Dom. Luis Fernando Castillo Mendez. 

APOSTOLIC NUNCIO'S of the Catholic Church of England & Wales.

Apostolic Nuncio / Delegate (officially known as an Apostolic nuncio ) is the title for an ecclesiastical diplomat, being an envoy or permanent representative of the Church or international organization. A nuncio is appointed by and represents the Archbishop primate, and is the head of the diplomatic mission, called an Apostolic Nunciature, which is the equivalent of an embassy. A nuncio is usually an bishop.

A nuncio is generally equivalent in rank to that of ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary, although in Catholic countries the nuncio often ranks above ambassadors in diplomatic protocol. A nuncio performs the same functions as an ambassador .


In addition, the nuncio serves as the liaison between the Archbishop primate and the Church in that particular nation, supervising the diocesan episcopate (usually a national conference of bishops which has its own chairman, usually the highest-ranking bishop or archbishop, especially if his seat carries the title of primate or he has individually been created a cardinal) and has an important role in the selection of bishops.


The name nuncio is derived from the ancient Latin word, nuntius, meaning "envoy" or "messenger".


Historically, the most important type of apocrisiary (a title also applying to representatives exchanged by a high prelate with a Patriarch) was the equivalent of a nuncio, sent by the Pope to the Byzantine Empire; during the fifth and sixth centuries, when much of Italy remained under Byzantine control, several Popes were former apocrisiaries.

Pro-nuncio was a term used from 1965 to 1991 for a papal diplomatic representative of full ambassadorial rank accredited to a country that did not accord him precedence over other ambassadors and de jure deanship of the Diplomatic Corps. In those countries, the representative's precedence within the corps is exactly on a par with that of the other members of ambassadorial rank, so that he becomes dean only on becoming the senior member of the corps.


In countries with whom the Church does not have diplomatic ties, an Apostolic Delegate may be sent to act as a liaison with the Catholic Church in that country, though not accredited to its government. Apostolic delegates have the same ecclesiastical rank as nuncios, but have no formal diplomatic status, though in some countries they have some diplomatic privileges.


Apostolic delegates are also sent to regions such as the West Indies and the islands of the Pacific. These delegates are also appointed nuncio to at least some of the many states covered by their delegation, but the area entrusted to them also contains one or more territories that either are not independent states or are states that do not have diplomatic relations with the Church.

The Jerusalem cross of the Apostolic Nuncio seal is  the symbol of the five-fold cross appears to originate in the 11th century, its association with the Kingdom of Jerusalem dates to the second half of the 13th century..

The symbolism of the five-fold cross is variously given as the Five Wounds of Christ, Christ and the four evangelists, or Christ and the four quarters of the world.

The symbolism of five crosses representing the Five Wounds is first recorded in the context of the consecration of the St Brelade's Church under the patronage of Robert of Normandy (before 1035); the crosses are incised in the church's altar stone.

The image of crossed keys to represent the metaphorical keys of the office of Saint Peter, the keys of heaven, or the keys of the kingdom of Heaven, that, according to Catholic teaching, Jesus promised to Saint Peter, empowering him to take binding actions. In the Gospel of Matthew 16:19, Jesus says to Peter, "I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on Earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on Earth shall be loosed in heaven."

The keys of heaven or keys of Saint Peter are seen as a symbol of authority: "Behold he [Peter] received the keys of the kingdom of heaven, the power of binding and loosing is committed to him, the care of the whole Church and its government is given to him [cura ei totius Ecclesiae et principatus committitur (Epist., lib. V, ep. xx, in P.L., LXXVII, 745)]".

Saint Peter is often depicted in Catholic and Eastern Orthodox paintings and other artwork as holding a key or a set of keys.

Bible verses associated with Peter and his position of authority: Is. 22:20-23; Matt. 10:2; Matt. 16:18-19; Luke 22:32; John 21:17; Acts 2:14; Acts 10:46; Gal. 1:18.

The image of crossed keys to represent the metaphorical keys of the office of Saint Peter, the keys of heaven, or the keys of the kingdom of Heaven, that, according to Catholic teaching, Jesus promised to Saint Peter, empowering him to take binding actions.

In the Gospel of Matthew 16:19, Jesus says to Peter, "I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on Earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on Earth shall be loosed in heaven."


The keys of heaven or keys of Saint Peter are seen as a symbol of authority: "Behold he [Peter] received the keys of the kingdom of heaven, the power of binding and loosing is committed to him, the care of the whole Church and its government is given to him [cura ei totius Ecclesiae et principatus committitur (Epist., lib. V, ep. xx, in P.L., LXXVII, 745)]".


Saint Peter is often depicted in Catholic and Eastern Orthodox paintings and other artwork as holding a key or a set of keys.


Bible verses associated with Peter and his position of authority: Is. 22:20-23; Matt. 10:2; Matt. 16:18-19; Luke 22:32; John 21:17; Acts 2:14; Acts 10:46; Gal. 1:18.